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Henside the Beltline Tour d’Coop 2008

Homes for Hens

April, 23, 2008, by Tim

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Peck image to peep slideshow

Has Raleigh Gone to the Birds? From New York and Chicago to Seattle and Los Angeles, city chickens are sweeping, er, scratching across the nation.  From 10 am to 4 pm on May 17, 2008, the 3rd Annual Hen-side the Beltline Tour d’Coop will showcase 20 of Raleigh’s backyard flocks, all located inside the beltline.

The motivations for raising chickens are as diverse as the shelters that house our feathered friends. Whether in lieu of the repeated failures of the food industry to provide safe and humane animal products or as an educational exercise to foster environmental connectivity and responsibility for children, food is still the most obvious reason to keep chickens. Some small flock owners see their birds as pets and find it too difficult to eat them, while others admittedly have no problem with savoring a respectfully raised healthy bird. Either way, there is simply no comparison between a caged industrial bird’s bland egg and that of a well-tended backyard chicken, attentively raised and allowed to forage on insects and foliage, giving the yolk a radiant glow. Urban chickens often have their diet supplemented with garden or table scraps, which they readily break down into black gold, that is, droppings.  The droppings can be easily collected from beneath the roosts, where the chickens sleep, and quickly composted for use as fertilizer. The bottom line is the owners enjoy their flocks for the amusing bird behaviors, the spectacular array of colors, combs, and feather patterns, and in some cases, nostalgia stemming from childhood memories on the farm.

Don’t miss this once a year Parade of Combs. Tickets will be available the day of the tour in exchange for a non-perishable food or cash donation to benefit Raleigh Urban Ministries. Tickets will be available at the following locations:

       

Steven B. Andreaus, DDS, PA (1637 Glenwood Avenue, across from the Rialto Theater)

        Ornamentea (509 N. West Street, one block south of Peace Street)

        CupAJoe (2109-142 Avent Ferry Road, in the lower level of Mission Valley Shopping Center)

        Whole Foods Market (3540 Wade Avenue, in the Ridgewood Shopping Center)

        Seaboard ACE Hardware (802 Semart Drive, across from Logan’s Nursery)

Green markers indicate ticket locations. Yellow markers indicate approximate locations for coops. Exact locations will be released with ticket purchase. Coop descriptions available HERE.


 








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  • Raising chickens in Raleigh: Tour d' coop
    06/05 02:25 PM

    Me and my girlfriend went on this tour for the first time this year, and got to see 5 different urban coops.  It was all very cool, and we learned a lot about chicken-raising, plus we got to meet some neat people.

    I put up some pictures here of the tour:
    http://www.ecojoes.com/henside-the-beltline-tour-d-coop-2008-raleigh/

  • Maureen Knickrehm
    11/08 02:30 AM

    there are some really great ideas here. Can’t wait to put some of these into action. Its really going to bring good vibrations where the vibrations should bebuy ugg boots

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